Reach and Frequency Buying Guidelines

Use this lesson to:

  • Recommend for or against reach and frequency buying.
  • Differentiate between standard, sequenced and scheduled ad delivery.
  • Define a frequency cap.

Lead with your objective

Reach and frequency buying is available across several of our campaign objectives, but it’s important to note that we don’t recommend it in certain scenarios. If your objective is to get your audience to perform a specific action, reach and frequency buying may not be ideal.

We recommend using reach and frequency buying with exposure based objectives like Reach, Brand Awareness and Video Views. For example, if you want people to watch your video or be more aware of your brand, we recommend using the reach and frequency buying type.

We don’t recommend using reach and frequency buying with action based objectives like Traffic, Catalog Sales and App Installs. In other words, if you want people to buy something from your website or install your app, the auction buying type might be a better option.

Plan for predictable pricing

When you create a campaign using reach and frequency, you’re agreeing to pay a set price for the advertising inventory placement you reserve. Since it’s a predicted cost, it may fluctuate day over day based on things like seasonality and ad quality.

You can create campaigns that range from 1 to 90 days and can schedule them up to six months in advance.

For reach and frequency campaigns, the cost is always CPM, meaning you’ll pay per thousand impressions.

Find your ideal audience

Reach and frequency campaigns are compatible with most Facebook targeting capabilities but there are some exceptions.

Click the headings below to reveal more.

Deliver your best work

It’s a best practice to have multiple ads within an ad set.

If you have multiple ads within your ad set, the system will optimize delivery towards the best performing ads (based on your campaign objective). Having more than one ad helps minimize the likelihood that delivery will be slow because of a poor performing ad.

Each ad set has its own Budget, Reach, Frequency, Targeting and Placements.

You can find more information about objectives, ad formats and placements available for reach and frequency buying here.

If you haven’t submitted any ads by the scheduled start time of your campaign, you a grace period to do so before the ad set will be canceled. The length of the grace period is dependent on the duration of your campaign.

Campaign length
Grace period
Up to 1 day  6 hours
1-2 days 12 hours
3+ days 24 hours

If your ad set is canceled, you lose your fixed price and reach.

Choose between standard, sequenced and scheduled delivery

 Best when… How it works  Limitations
Standard Your creative message doesn’t need to be delivered in any particular order or on any particular date. The system will deliver a single or multiple ad campaign based on the best performing ad. You don’t control the order in which people see your ads or the date the ads are delivered.
Sequenced You want to deliver multiple ads in a certain order to tell a coherent story (for example, no one will see ad two of your series unless they see ad one first). You choose the order in which you want people to experience your ads. Delivery is based on login behavior so we can’t guarantee that people who see the first ad in your series will see the ones that follow.
Scheduled You want to deliver a message that relates to the day it’s delivered (like the final day to shop a sale or the series premiere of a new TV show). You choose the date when you want people to experience your ads. People might not see the complete series of ads.

Set a frequency cap that aligns with your goal

A frequency cap is the maximum number of times your ad will be delivered to someone within a given period of time.

Generally, large brand advertisers are most successful when they focus on reaching more people. They can do that by choosing a lower frequency cap (like one to two ads per week). Newer brands with less brand recognition who are running shorter campaigns may create more memorable impressions by increasing their frequency cap to show more ads to a smaller group of people and maximize awareness.

For example:

A well known pop singer with a new album coming out might set a one to two ad per week frequency cap so that more people learn about her album.

An up and coming DJ might set a frequency cap of five to six ads per week because people won’t recognize his “brand” as easily.

Knowledge check

Key takeaways

  • When you create a campaign using reach and frequency, you’re agreeing to pay a set price for the advertising inventory placement you reserve.
  • It’s a best practice to have multiple ads within an ad set.
  • A frequency cap is the maximum number of times your ad will be delivered to someone within a given period of time.

 Keep learning

Check out these resources to continue growing your skills.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *